170+ tutors at half the price

We offer experienced LSAT tutors for 1-on-1 private tutoring at less than half the price of Kaplan, Powerscore and Princeton Review.
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UBE BAR EXAM TUTORING & Essay Review

Our instructors are licensed attorneys who aced the bar exam, and have tutored a minimum of 25-successful test takers. Our students currently hold a 100% pass rate (pending July 25 [fingers crossed]).
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Improving LSAT scores & Bar Exam pass rates nationwide

Although we have an organized methodology to beating the LSAT and the bar, our tutors tailor their methods and style to each student. We simplify even the most challenging concepts found on the LSAT and the bar with easy to relate to every day logic. We continue to grow by the day, we’re proud to offer tutoring in virtually every major metropolitan area nationwide from New York to Philadelphia to Los Angeles and virtually every where in between. Are we in your city? Give us a...
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170+ tutors at half the price

We offer experienced LSAT tutors for 1-on-1 private tutoring at less than half the price of Kaplan, Powerscore and Princeton Review.
read more

Applying To Law School With Disciplinary Action

We’re not perfect. Well, at least most of us aren’t. A lot of LSAT test takers made mistakes when they were younger and more immature that could be anything from a fraternity prank gone awry to a drunk driving infraction. So is it true? After all those long hard months of studying to get that great LSAT score, could a mistake made several years back kill your law school dreams? This is a question that thousands of applicants have each year, and the quick answer is yes and no. While it is important to distinguish yourself on your law school apps so that you are an individual outside of just your GPA and LSAT score, it is equally important to not distinguish yourself in a negative way. The way questions about a criminal record, and collegiate disciplinary action are asked, there is really not much of a gray area. Virtually all applications ask you to disclose even matters that have been expunged or that have been removed from your transcript. A lot of applicants think that if matters have been expunged, they are safe to not disclose. The truth is that this could not be further from the truth. Lying on your law school application can be grounds for future disciplinary action, and even expulsion. Law school is stressful enough with the financial pressures and intense competition that having to spend three years constantly worrying, “Will they find out?” can not only be a profound distraction from your academics, but take a tremendous toll on your happiness in and out of the classroom. Further, the bar association does go into depth in researching all those who apply, and they CAN find out about criminal and academic records even if such records have been removed. Lawyers are expected to uphold a certain moral and ethical code, and it simply will not bode well if one of the first tangible steps that you took towards becoming a lawyer in applying to law schools was built upon a lie. Imagine shelling out 200k for law school, and doing great in the classroom, but not being able to practice law, because you failed to answer a simple question honestly. Moreover, one can even have their legal license revoked if it comes out years later that they lied on their law school application. If you can spend your career under this level of stress,...
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